Why the booths argument is a distraction.

One of the biggest arguments currently raging in educational circles is on the use of isolation booths in schools. It is an argument that appears to have rapidly polarised into extreme positions, particularly on Twitter. However, I firmly believe that is an argument that is distracting from the core business of educating children.

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Toxicity in Education

When I wrote Trust in Education, I was writing about good leadership, ways that good leaders can build a great culture and empower their staff to be better. This article is about something that is in many ways the polar opposite – the Toxic Triangle, which can exist in all organisations.

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Thanks for reading this.

Last night, while strolling back from enjoying an evening at #BrewEdYork, I decided to stop for a bite to eat. While waiting for my food to arrive (two chicken fillets and chips with spicy mayo for those interested in after-alcohol dining experiences), a group of four children entered the dining establishment.

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Why are we still talking about workload from marking?

In 2014 the government’s Workload Challenge survey identified the frequency and extent of marking requirements as a key driver of large teacher workloads. The reform of marking policies was the highest workload-related priority for 53% of respondents. More recently, the 2016 report of the Independent Teacher Workload Review Group noted that written marking had become unnecessarily burdensome for teachers and recommended that all marking should be driven by professional judgement and be “meaningful, manageable and motivating”.

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Trust in Education

In any successful classroom, relationships between teacher and adult are built on trust. Whether it is the consistency of action in behaviour management or simply doing what you said you would. Trust allows students to take risks without fear of castigation for failure, they trust that their teachers will have their back.

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Razing ‘Aspirations’

Razing Aspirations

Ok, I’ll admit it, I have shamelessly pinched this pun from @SchoolsWeek, but it really caught my eye. I imagined teacher’s armed with pitchforks and burning torches burning the “aspirations” monster like the windmill in Frankenstein. My first instinct was to send a teacherly reply suggesting they spellcheck their tweets in future, however, on reading the article which the tweet was linked to, I have decided to salute them for a great “clickbait” headline.

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